August 19, 2016

Soon, app to check vitals of patients in ambulances

NEW DELHI:

To save trauma patients while being transported to the hospital in an ambulance, AIIMS has initiated the process of developing a web application to control his or her vital parameters by providing expert opinion and advice. Prof. M.C. Mishra, the director of AIIMS Delhi, said that the web application will help in reducing trauma death during transportation of patients to the hospital. According to Prof. Mishra, a large number of trauma patients die due to excessive bleeding before reaching a hospital and this web application will help in preventing or lowering such deaths.

The development of this web application is part of the “Australia-India Trau-ma Systems Collaborati-on” for reducing the burden of injury in both the countries through development and the piloting of improved systems of care.

Explaining the main reason behind trauma deaths in the country, Prof. Mishra said that against a general perception of a patient dying due to injury, it was found that apart from this, in maximum cases, patients died due to excessive bleeding and poor handling on his or her way to the hospital.

“Through this web application, which we are developing, experts at the AIIMS Trauma Centre will advice the attendant in the ambulance to stop bleeding, or control other vital parameters like blood pressure, heart beat or to provide oxygen if needed,” Prof. Mishra added.

AIIMS’ Centre for Community Medicine-managed Comprehensive Rural Centre at Ballabgarh in Haryana, meanwhile, has been connected with the main hospital through broadband to provide for real time advice for trauma care.

Dr Amit Gupta, the additional professor in the division of trauma surgery and amputation at the AIIMS Trauma Centre, said that by using this technology, experts from AIIMS are not only advising the patient at Ballabgarh, but also monitoring their vitals. “Real-time connectivity for trauma care is in its trial stage and if successful, it will be linked to national knowledge network,” Dr Gupta added.

Trauma experts from 34 countries have gathered in the national capital to participate in the “3rd World Trauma Congress” to design strategies to prevent and control morbidity and mortality due to injury.

 

Source: http://www.asianage.com/delhi/soon-app-check-vitals-patients-ambulances-267

May 7, 2016

Every Day, 400 People Are Killed In Road Accidents In India, Shows Government Data

NEW DELHI: 

Its India’s worst kept secret – we have the world’s most unsafe roads and the situation seems to be getting worse by the year. Over 400 people were killed in road accidents every day in 2015, government data reveals.

Fresh data submitted by the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways in the Rajya Sabha this week indicates just how alarming the situation is. 1,46,133 people were killed in road accidents in India in 2015, a 4.6% rise over 2014 when 1,39,671 people were killed.

In the past one decade, over 1.3 million people have been killed in road accidents but there is still no comprehensive road safety legislation in the country. According to the 234th report of the Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism and Culture which has recently been tabled in Parliament, there are several stumbling blocks for replacing the existing Motor Vehicles Act with a proposed Road Transport and Safety Bill, 2015.

 

Source: http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/every-day-400-people-die-in-road-accidents-in-india-shows-government-data-1403899

October 16, 2015

Delhi: AIIMS works on light, airy helmets

NEW DELHI: All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), in collaboration with Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia, is working towards developing low-cost helmets with more ventilation and better suited for Indian weather conditions.

“We are trying to develop helmets which are light and airy so that people do not feel uncomfortable putting them on. Since, India’s climate is mostly hot and humid for the almost nine months of the year, people find wearing helmets uncomfortable,” said Dr M C Misra, AIIMS director.

He said around 377 people die on Indian roads every day-the world’s highest fatalities in road accidents, according to a 2013 report published by the ministry of road transport and highways.

Experts said such accidents can be avoided if people wear helmets.

Apart from this, AIIMS in collaboration with Monash University, Melbourne, is also doing a long-term research project in trauma systems. Under ‘Australia India Trauma Systems’ collaboration project, the apex trauma centre will try to develop a national trauma registry for the country.

AIIMS is also planning to develop a rehabilitation prescription application, which can be downloaded on smartphones, said Dr Amit Gupta, AIIMS spokesperson.

“Often patients after treatment go back home and it is not possible for them to come back again for consultation. In that case, they will be given reminders through the application to follow certain exercises and our physiotherapists will keep on assessing their quality of life after say three months or nine months,” said Dr Amit Gupta, the institute spokesperson.

 

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/AIIMS-works-on-light-airy-helmets/articleshow/49422149.cms

October 6, 2014

Road trauma drives hospital reform

India’s efforts to curb its high road toll are now focusing on hospitals and their capacity to save lives.

To drive along any road, anywhere in the world is a risk, but in India this goes to a whole new dimension of heart-in-your-mouth mayhem as every mode of transport fights for space in streets where, well, there isn’t any.

Children play in the shadow of roaring trucks and buses, and pedestrians stride alongside rickshaws, motorbikes, cars, cows and the occasional elephant. The streets are a riot of movement, colour and deafening noise – a road-safety nightmare.

“Pedestrians claim ownership of the road as much as drivers so you have a lot of people on the street,” says Professor Nobhojit Roy, a Mumbai trauma surgeon who every day experiences firsthand the consequences of this clash. “We have cars colliding with children and pedestrians, and a huge number of motorcycles.”

The bald statistic behind the mayhem and tragedy is that one person is killed on the roads every two to four minutes in India. The official annual road toll is more than 140,000 and rising: the result of poor road conditions, an increasing number of faster and heavier vehicles, and streets still full of people.

While traffic congestion means speeds often are not as high as in developed countries, people on foot and motorbike are vulnerable in any collision.

 

Full Article: http://www.monash.edu.au/monashmag/articles/issue8/road-trauma-drives-hospital-reform.html#.VywrXxV94UF

 

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September 5, 2014

India, Australia to collaborate on health care

Australia on Friday announced the extension of the Australia-India Strategic Research Fund (AISRF) for a further four years and also pledged Australian dollars (AUD) 20 million for the initiative. Visiting Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott made the announcement in Delhi after a visit to the Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre in AIIMS on Friday.

“This is not just for India or Australia, but for everyone’s benefit. That is why I am pleased to announce that over the next four years, AUD 20 million would be allocated by the Australian government for this partnership programme,” he said.

The two countries will also cooperate in the areas of a potential malaria vaccine which has been supported by the strategic research partnership. Australian and Indian governments have joined hands through the Australia-India Strategic

Research Fund Grand Challenge Scheme to find the best ways of treating injured people. “This partnership between Alfred Hospital and AIIMS is significant as part of our Science and Technology Strategic Research Partnership Programme. Alfred Trauma Centre is now looking to work with India’s premier trauma centre,” Mr. Abbott said.

India and Australia will collaborate in the areas of preventive healthcare, trauma care, geriatric medicine, diabetes research and mental illnesses; this was decided at a meeting between Mr. Abbott and the Union Health Minister, Dr Harsh Vardhan.

Referring to the discussion the Health Minister said the friendly relations that exist between India and Australia could materialise into manifold streams of cooperation in the health sector. Dr. Harsh Vardhan said there is a rich possibility in sharing India’s expertise as well as gaining from the Australian experience in the training of health care workers and nurses in geriatric care and emergency medicine and in telemedicine.

“I have shared with Mr Abbott the optimism evinced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the transformation of India’s health care system into a modern, affordable and accessible model before the developing world. Among other things, the Prime Minister has already cleared the opening of advanced secondary and tertiary health care institutions in every state of the country,” Dr Harsh Vardhan said.

The Australian PM appreciated the Pulse Polio movement which has eradicated polio from India. “There is a sense of altruism and commitment in the health care systems in both our countries,” he remarked. The Australian Prime Minister said that the existing Australia-India Trauma Systems Collaboration (AITSC) aims to reduce the burden of injury in both countries through development and piloting of improved systems of care.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/india-australia-to-collaborate-on-health-care/article6383782.ece

September 5, 2014

Australia Prime Minister Tony Abbott announces AUD 20million grant for Australia-India research fund

NEW DELHI: Australia today announced extension of the Australia-India Strategic Research Fund (AISRF) for a further four years and also pledged Australian dollars (AUD) 20 million for the initiative.

“This is not just for India or Australia, but for everyone’s benefit. That is why I am pleased to announce that over the next four years, AUD 20 million would be allocated by the Australian government for this partnership programme,” visiting Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said here.

“We are cooperating in health and also elsewhere. For instance, there is a potential malaria vaccine which has been supported by the strategic research partnership. We have water quality improvement which is being supported by the programme,” he added.

He was speaking at AIIMS, where he had gone to see the research activities at the trauma centre being carried out in collaboration with the Australians.

Beginning in 2013, the Australian and Indian governments have joined hands through the Australia-India Strategic Research Fund Grand Challenge Scheme to find the best ways of treating injured people.

The Australia-India Trauma Systems Collaboration (AITSC) programme also brings together governments, industry, clinicians and researchers to improve information and resources and to pilot new systems of care. The collaboration is being carried out between Alfred Hospital in Melbourne and AIIMS.

Abbott noted that Australia would work with India not as an aid-giver but as a partner and added that the collaboration between AIIMS and Alfred Hospital was significant as both countries could learn from each other.

“I pledge that Australia would continue to work with you not as an aid-giver but as a partnership seeker,” he said.

“This partnership between Alfred Hospital and AIIMS is significant as part of our Science and Technology Strategic Research Partnership Programme. Alfred Trauma Centre is now looking to work with India’s premier trauma centre,” he said.

Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan and Minister of State for Science and Technology Jitendra Singh were also present at the event.

Abbott said there is a feeling of altruism in the two countries and both are strongly committed to the health sector.

Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan said the Indian government was working to ensure access to healthcare for the poorest of the poor. He added that such bilateral projects would help improve healthcare systems in both countries.

Jitendra Singh, , who was also present at the event said that collaboration in the field of trauma treatment was very important as India had a large and increasing young population.

Mortality among the younger population was due to road accidents and other “adventures and misadventures” and the joint initiative would certainly help bring down such deaths, he added.

 

Source: http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2014-09-05/news/53602225_1_australia-india-strategic-research-fund-australian-and-indian-governments-aiims

February 6, 2014

Australia and India collaborate on trauma care

India and Australia have joined forces to tackle road trauma care.

In India, one person is killed in a road accident every two to four minutes.

‘Trauma from road accidents is one of the world’s biggest health problems and this partnership will help India develop a world-class trauma system that will save lives,’ said Australia’s Foreign Minister Julie Bishop.

‘It’s a great example of bilateral co-operation and another powerful demonstration of how sophisticated the relationship between our two countries has become.’

Ms Bishop was taking part in the signing of a five-year agreement between the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and the National Trauma Research Institute, part of Alfred Health, the Victorian-based health service renowned for its world-leading trauma care.

The partnership will include exchanges between countries, institutional links and jointly-planned initiatives in policy development, research, training and design of services for handling critically-injured accident victims.

According to official estimates, the 2012 Indian road toll was 138,258, more than in any other country.

‘Road accidents form a major part of the country’s preventable deaths,’ said Indian Health Secretary Keshav Desiraju.

‘We are trying to provide very good trauma care facilities both on highways as well as inside the cities.’

‘Australia, and particularly Victoria, has shown that a well-organised system of trauma care saves lives helps patients recover and improves their quality of life,’ said Professor Russell Gruen, Director of the National Trauma Research Institute.

‘Injured people and their families, their communities and national productivity all stand to benefit.’

This agreement follows NTRI and Monash University signing a $2.5 million four-year research agreement with the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Delhi to determine the best ways of improving trauma care in India.

This research collaboration is supported by the Australian Department of Industry and the Indian Department of Science and Technology through the Australia-India Strategic Research Fund.

It is predicted that road accidents will be the world’s third-leading cause of death within 10 years.

For every death, many more are seriously or permanently disabled.

In India and Australia, injury is the leading cause of death of children and young adults and a leading cause of lost productivity.

 

Source: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/healthvictoria/feb14/collab.htm

November 11, 2013

India and Australia sign MoU to fund joint road safety strategy

India and Australia will jointly invest more than $A2.7 million to develop a strategy to reduce road injuries and fatalities in both the countries.

Announcing the Australia India Trauma Systems Collaboration (AITSC), the Vice Chairman of India’s National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA), M Shashidhar Reddy said the World Health Organisation had predicted road accident death would be third largest among deaths resulting from any disease globally by 2020.

He said India would rate high on that list so the nation needed a system which could bring about change that was quick, feasible and inexpensive. Forty per cent of road accidents caused briad injury which could be prevented by wearing a helmet.

The signing of MoU between Melbourne-based National Trauma Research Institute and the JPN Apex Trauma Centre was overseen by Patrick Suckling, Australian High Commissioner to India, Dr Muzaffar Ahmad, Member, NDMA and Prof Russell Gruen, Director of NTRI among other dignitaries.

The AITSC’s website -www.ai-tsc.org was launched at the ceremony which was part of the sixth annual Trauma Congress organised by Indian Society for Trauma and Acute Care (ISTAC) and JPN Apex Trauma Centre.

This year’s forum ‘Trauma 2013’ with theme -‘Promote Safety-Prevent Pain’ invited surgeons, neurosurgeons, orthopaedic surgeons, emergency physicians and nursing and paramedic fields from all over the world.

 

Source: http://www.invest.vic.gov.au/news-and-events/2013/nov/2013-11-11-india-and-australia-sign-mou-to-fund-joint-road-safety-strategy

May 6, 2013

India, Australia team up for trauma care system

With over five million deaths reported each year due to injuries, a collaboration was announced between India and Australia to develop world class trauma care system.

Both the countries are investing over $2.6 million in the Australia-India Trauma Systems Collaboration (AITSC). Australian High Commissioner Patrick Suckling inaugurated the AITSC on Friday.

Led by the National Trauma Research Institute, a partnership between the Alfred Hospital and Monash University in Melbourne, and the JPN Apex Trauma Centre at AIIMS, the programme brings together some of the world’s leaders in trauma care.

‘It will lay the foundations for a national trauma system in India. It will also provide needed evidence about low-cost trauma system interventions that could be implemented in most countries without the need for major health system re-design,’ said the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) director MC Mishra.

The collaboration will help India and Australia develop world class trauma care for those who need it most.

‘Trauma is a growing challenge for the country and the world. Of the total volume of injury, about 40 per cent is the brain injury and most of them are easily preventable by precautions and timely intervention,’ said Mishra.

Arabinda Mitra of the Department of Science and Technology said: ‘This collaboration is going to touch lives of people. It is going to be a path-breaking project and would become a flagship project.’

The project will focus on varied issues like developing protocols to provide prompt relief to injured, rehabilitation, trauma quality improvement programs and preparing trauma registry among others.

 

Source: http://monash.edu/news/show/india-and-australia-to-collaborate-for-better-trauma-care

May 6, 2013

Global Alliance for Care of the Injured

GACI working groups include:

 

Trauma system development

Long-term goals
  • Encourage improvements in trauma care by promoting trauma system planning, development and monitoring at the country level.
  • Promote best practices and policy-level changes for system-wide improvements in care of the injured.
Next steps
  • Develop a road map document that contains a description of the elements of trauma systems, which are globally applicable; along with a rating system for each element.
  • Develop an assessment guide on how the road map document can be used for both external and internal assessment of the status of trauma systems and for identification of next steps in trauma system development.

Evidence and research

Long-term goals
  • Facilitate an up-to-date evidence base that relates directly to the goals of GACI and set an agenda to promote research to address the most important evidence gaps.
Next steps
  • Document success stories that are examples of what has worked in advancing trauma systems in different settings globally.
  • Develop a list of relevant evidence resources.
  • Engage with international research consortia to identify the most important knowledge gaps.

Trauma registry and data

Long-term goals
  • Promote wider and more standardized collection of data for injury surveillance and trauma care quality improvement.
Next steps
  • Establish a minimum dataset to facilitate trauma registry implementation.
  • Compile case studies of good practice in establishing trauma registries globally.

Education and capacity building

Long-term goals
  • Identify gaps in current capacity and promote training to address these gaps.
  • Share information, experiences, and expertise through development of technical partnerships and other collaborative projects, including exchange visits and direct support to countries.
Next steps
  • Develop institutional twinning and individual mentorship programmes that would benefit developing trauma systems, in similar to fashion to the existing Mentor-VIP programme.
  • Undertake courses on trauma system planning and on trauma quality improvement at the request of countries and regions.

Advocacy

Long-term goals
  • Encourage increased attention and resource allocation for trauma care through advocacy efforts that will ultimately lead to increased access to essential trauma care services for all injured persons globally.
Next steps
  • Develop an aspirational statement to guide advocacy efforts.
  • Develop advocacy materials to promote GACI’s goals.

Other Participant Activities

 

Australia-India Trauma Systems Collaboration

Formal trauma systems have proven effective in lowering injury-related death and disability in high income countries, where expensive and complex care structures have evolved. There is, however, little data relevant to limited resource settings where over ninety percent of the world’s injured are managed in quite different conditions.

Established with $2.6 million support from the Australia-India Strategic Research Fund Grand Challenge Scheme, the Australia-India Trauma Systems Collaboration (AITSC) brings together clinicians and researchers within the WHO Global Alliance for Care of the Injured, with university, government and industry partners. AITSC aims to develop and test innovative pre-hospital, hospital and post-hospital interventions that could improve care of the injured in countries at all levels of development. Examples include establishing mechanisms and protocols for field communication between pre-hospital care providers and receiving hospitals; telehealth technology allowing metropolitan and rural centres to connect with specialist trauma hospitals for real-time advice; trauma quality improvement training programs; and tailored home- and facility-based rehabilitation prescriptions to improve long-term recovery.

Led by the Australian National Trauma Research Institute, a partnership between The Alfred Hospital and Monash University in Melbourne, and the JPN Apex Trauma Centre at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Delhi, the AITSC engages Australian, Indian and international partner organizations from around the world.

 

Source: http://www.who.int/emergencycare/gaci/activities/en/

May 6, 2013

India and Australia to collaborate for better trauma care

India and Australia are joining forces to tackle one of the world’s most significant health challenges – the increasing road toll that kills one person every two to four minutes in India.

In the presence of Australia’s Foreign Minister, The Hon. Julie Bishop MP, the Indian Ministry of Health and Family Welfare have signed a five-year agreement with The National Trauma Research Institute (NTRI), a collaboration between Monash University and Alfred Health, the Victorian based health service renowned for its world leading trauma care.

The partnership will include exchanges between countries, institutional linkages, and jointly planned initiatives in policy development, research, training and design of services for handling critically-injured accident victims.

Monash University’s Professor Russell Gruen, a trauma surgeon, is Director of the National Trauma Research Institute.

“Australia, and particularly Victoria, has shown that a well-organised system of trauma care saves lives, helps patients recover and improves their quality of life,” Professor Gruen said.

“Injured people and their families, their communities, and national productivity all stand to benefit.”

According to official estimates, the 2012 Indian road toll was 138,258, more than in any other country.

This agreement follows one week after the NTRI and Monash University signed a $2.5 million (AUD) 4-year research agreement with the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in Delhi to determine the best ways of improving trauma care in India. This research collaboration is supported by the Australian Department of Industry and the Indian Department of Science and Technology through the Australia-India Strategic Research Fund.

Director of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Professor Mahesh.C Misra, said the partnership would assist India to develop a world-class trauma system to address the increasing road toll in India that accounts for one death every two minutes.

It is predicted that road accidents will be the world’s third leading cause of death within 10 years. For every death many more are seriously or permanently disabled. In India and Australia, injury is the leading cause of death of children and young adults, and a leading cause of lost productivity.

“Road accidents form a major part of the country’s preventable deaths. We are trying to give very good trauma care facilities both on highways as well as inside the cities,” said the Indian Health Secretary, Mr Keshav Desiraju.

 

Source: http://monash.edu/news/show/india-and-australia-to-collaborate-for-better-trauma-care